Give Yourself to Others …

Archive for the ‘opinion’ Category

Carey Nieuwhof has written a great post on Audience Analysis applied to Sermon preparation & delivery:

How To Know What Your Audience Is Thinking BEFORE You Communicate

Too often, people who present material (on any topic, not just spiritual topics) focus on what they have to say, rather than what their audience will hear.

In his post, Carey describes his process to bring those two things closer together.

This is worth review by any preacher or teacher, or even sales rep!

When you have the time, you should do a little research on the history of the doctrine of the Trinity.  I’m not going to review the whole history in this post, but it’s useful history to be aware of.

The short version goes back to the First Council of Nicaea, in 325.  There were a lot of theological disputes back in those days, so Emperor Constantine pressured the leading bishops of the day to gather and resolve these.  One of the issues centered around the nature of Jesus Christ.  Ultimately related to that question was which of the writings in circulation at the time, should be considered “sacred.”

As part of the discussion, one guy promulgated what we know call “The Trinity”, God in three persons, but one God.

I don’t have any huge objection to the use of this “paradigm”, but I think we should recognize it is an attempt to explain something about God, which we cannot understand.  So, it’s more a statement about our capacity to grasp God, than it is a statement about God.

As you may know, one of the significant objections Muslims have to the way Christians talk about God, is that we have three gods (Father, Son, Spirit), while Muslims have but one God.

I think the Muslims have phrased it more properly.

God has presented himself to us in three different ways.  But that has to do with our intellectual capabilities, not the limits of God.

He presented himself as Jesus, to give us a living example of what it means to be the person he wants us to be.

He presents himself as the Spirit, because of his continuing presence and influence in our life, if we are persistent in seeking him.

But God is God.  He is sovereign.

We should acknowledge him and him alone, and admit we can’t comprehend everything there is to know about God.

Humility is a good thing.

Have you ever noticed, being a disciple of Jesus is inconvenient?

As a Jesus disciple, our focus is ideally, and continually, on others, seeking to do what is best for them. Figuring out what is best for others takes time and thought. Then actually doing it, may be even more difficult — either in terms of time or effort.

But all of that is inconvenient — but then, it’s not about us, is it?

But the law of loving others could not be discovered by reason, because it is unreasonable / Leo Tolstoy (Anna Karenina)

For Jesus’ believers, this post by Seth Godin raises and interesting question.  Worth your consideration

The reality is that, for most people, that’s not a very exciting invitation.  (I struggled a little with what adjective to put in front of invitation).

The reason, in my view, is the connotation surrounding “church.”  Many theological people are typically quick to point out that the “church” is truly made up of Christians.  And I acknowledge that fact.

However, also true is that the word, church, comes from the German word, kirche, which refers to the cathedral, not the people.  And in everyday usage, church more often refers to the building or facility, than to the people who gather there.  It also often refers to the organization more often than to a generic gathering of people.

So, when you say, “come to church with me”, what does your audience really hear?

It seems to me most likely they are hearing you invite them to an organizational meeting, which you hope they will join.

Perhaps we would be better off, if we invited people to “come worship with me.”

Like many people, I’ve probably read 1 Corinthians 13, a thousand times.  The description of “love” by Paul, is beautifully inspiring.  I often read it when I perform weddings.

On a side note, the old King James Version translation of agape as “charity” is probably a better translation than “love.”  But that’s a topic for another time.

What I’ve missed in the thousands of times I’ve read 1 Cor 13 are the first three verses (this is from The Message):

13 If I speak with human eloquence and angelic ecstasy but don’t love, I’m nothing but the creaking of a rusty gate.

2 If I speak God’s Word with power, revealing all his mysteries and making everything plain as day, and if I have faith that says to a mountain, “Jump,” and it jumps, but I don’t love, I’m nothing.

3-7 If I give everything I own to the poor and even go to the stake to be burned as a martyr, but I don’t love, I’ve gotten nowhere. So, no matter what I say, what I believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love.

Am I the only one who missed this?

I can be the smartest person in the world.  I can understand everything … even the greatest mysteries about God … I may have so much faith that I can perform miracles … I can be the most generous person in the world.

And if all of this is true, but I’m not loving others, the way Jesus loved me, then it’s all pointless.

If we are not loving towards one another, we’ve missed the whole point from Jesus.

Think about that, the next time you argue about doctrine!


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