Give Yourself to Others …

Have you ever noticed, being a disciple of Jesus is inconvenient?

As a Jesus disciple, our focus is ideally, and continually, on others, seeking to do what is best for them. Figuring out what is best for others takes time and thought. Then actually doing it, may be even more difficult — either in terms of time or effort.

But all of that is inconvenient — but then, it’s not about us, is it?

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The point of Christianity is not the perfection with which we live our lives, but rather, the forgiveness, which masks our imperfections.

But the law of loving others could not be discovered by reason, because it is unreasonable / Leo Tolstoy (Anna Karenina)

For Jesus’ believers, this post by Seth Godin raises and interesting question.  Worth your consideration

This is a great post.  Please read it now:  Five Bible Verses You need to Stop Misusing

 

The reality is that, for most people, that’s not a very exciting invitation.  (I struggled a little with what adjective to put in front of invitation).

The reason, in my view, is the connotation surrounding “church.”  Many theological people are typically quick to point out that the “church” is truly made up of Christians.  And I acknowledge that fact.

However, also true is that the word, church, comes from the German word, kirche, which refers to the cathedral, not the people.  And in everyday usage, church more often refers to the building or facility, than to the people who gather there.  It also often refers to the organization more often than to a generic gathering of people.

So, when you say, “come to church with me”, what does your audience really hear?

It seems to me most likely they are hearing you invite them to an organizational meeting, which you hope they will join.

Perhaps we would be better off, if we invited people to “come worship with me.”

Like many people, I’ve probably read 1 Corinthians 13, a thousand times.  The description of “love” by Paul, is beautifully inspiring.  I often read it when I perform weddings.

On a side note, the old King James Version translation of agape as “charity” is probably a better translation than “love.”  But that’s a topic for another time.

What I’ve missed in the thousands of times I’ve read 1 Cor 13 are the first three verses (this is from The Message):

13 If I speak with human eloquence and angelic ecstasy but don’t love, I’m nothing but the creaking of a rusty gate.

2 If I speak God’s Word with power, revealing all his mysteries and making everything plain as day, and if I have faith that says to a mountain, “Jump,” and it jumps, but I don’t love, I’m nothing.

3-7 If I give everything I own to the poor and even go to the stake to be burned as a martyr, but I don’t love, I’ve gotten nowhere. So, no matter what I say, what I believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love.

Am I the only one who missed this?

I can be the smartest person in the world.  I can understand everything … even the greatest mysteries about God … I may have so much faith that I can perform miracles … I can be the most generous person in the world.

And if all of this is true, but I’m not loving others, the way Jesus loved me, then it’s all pointless.

If we are not loving towards one another, we’ve missed the whole point from Jesus.

Think about that, the next time you argue about doctrine!

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